How can I submit meta data for a complete journal or conference?

As explained, dblp always indexes the tables of contents of complete proceedings or journal volumes in bulk. On this page you find a guideline on how to provide data of a complete volume in the dblp input format.

Please read also:

Usually, dblp seeks to obtain bibliographic meta data from the major publishers directly. Whenever this is not possible, dblp depends on the submission of data from individuals such as conference chairs and journal editors. The effort of these valuable helpers allows a timely inclusion of new proceedings or journal volumes to the data base which would otherwise have to wait in dblp 's priority queue. To allow for a convenient submission of publication data, a new XML based submission format has been developed. This comprehensive user's guide provides assistance on how to use this new format, and enables you to contribute high-quality meta data to dblp .

Introduction

dblp was started in 1993 as a purely handcrafted HTML application. Later essential parts were converted to XML, but the input "language" remained to be the same HTML-style language it has been in the 90s. Unfortunately, this old input format turned out to be quite cumbersome for irregular submitters of bibliographic meta data. With the new XML submission format, DBLP introduces a format that aims to be convenient and easy to understand.

In the past, submissions to dblp have occurred in many different ways and on many different quality levels. Time and resources at dblp are limited, so quite often the inclusion interesting scientific work had to be deferred since the additional work necessary to bring submitted data to a processible level could not be afforded. The new XML submission scheme is also an attempt to assist you in submitting data that is (almost) ready for inclusion. We hope that this will help to save time on both ends of the process and, therefore, allows for a timelier inclusion of your data to the dblp bibliography database.

XML submission format guidelines

This section introduces the new DBLP submission format by examples. A DTD or a XSD file describing the XML format can be found in the attachments

For excerpts from a DBLP submission file of a conference proceedings or journal volume, see the following code blocks. The complete example files can be found in the attachments:

The following summary provides a detailed explanation of the components of a valid DBLP submission file.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<!DOCTYPE dblpsubmission SYSTEM "http://dblp.org/xml/dblpsubmission.dtd">
<dblpsubmission>
  <proceedings>
    <key>crypto</key>
    <editor>Tal Rabin</editor>
    <title>Advances in Cryptology - CRYPTO 2010.
      30th Annual Cryptology Conference.</title>
    <publisher>Springer</publisher>
    <year>2010</year>
    <isbn type="print">978-3-642-14622-0</isbn>
    <doi>10.1007/978-3-642-14623-7</doi>
    <conf>
      <acronym>CRYPTO</acronym>
      <number>30</number>
      <location>Santa Barbara, California, USA</location>
      <date>August 15-19, 2010</date>
      <url>http://www.iacr.org/conferences/crypto2010/</url>
    </conf>
    <series>
      <key>lncs</key>
      <title>Lecture Notes in Computer Science</title>
      <number>6223</number>
    </series>
    <toc>
      <section>Leakage</section>
      <publ>
        <author>Zvika Brakerski</author>
        <author>Shafi Goldwasser</author>
        <title>Circular and Leakage Resilient Public-Key Encryption
          under Subgroup Indistinguishability</title>
        <pages>1-20</pages> 
        <doi>10.1007/978-3-642-14623-7_1</doi>
      </publ>
      <section>Lattice</section>
      <publ>
        <author>Chris Peikert</author>
        <title>An Efficient and Parallel Gaussian Sampler for Lattices.</title>
        <pages>80-97</pages>
        <doi>10.1007/978-3-642-14623-7_5</doi>
      </publ>
    </toc>
  </proceedings>
</dblpsubmission>
<dblpsubmission>
  <journal>
    <key>cacm</key>
    <title>Communications of the ACM</title>
    <short>Commun. ACM</short>
    <publisher>ACM</publisher>
    <address>New York</address>
    <issn type="print">0001-0782</issn>
    <issn type="electronic">1557-7317</issn>
    <url>http://cacm.acm.org/</url>
    <volume>
      <number>50</number>
      <issue>
        <number>1</number>
        <month>January</month>
        <year>2007</year>
        <toc> 
          <text>The patent holder's dilemma: buy, sell, or troll?</text>
          <publ>
            <author>Diane Crawford</author>
            <title>Editorial pointers.</title>
            <pages>5</pages>
            <doi proxy="http://doi.acm.org/">10.1145/1188924</doi>
          </publ>
          <publ>
            <title>News track.</title>
            <pages>9-10</pages>
            <doi proxy="http://doi.acm.org/">10.1145/1188926</doi>
          </publ>
          <section>The business of software</section>
          <publ>
            <author>Phillip G. Armour</author>
            <title>Agile ... and offshore.</title>
            <pages>13-16</pages>
            <doi proxy="http://doi.acm.org/">10.1145/1188930</doi>
          </publ>
        </toc>
      </issue>
    </volume>
  </journal>
</dblpsubmission>

XML document root

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<!DOCTYPE dblpsubmission SYSTEM "http://dblp.org/xml/dblpsubmission.dtd">
<dblpsubmission>
  <proceedings>
    ...
  </proceedings>
  <journal>
    ...
  </journal>
  ...
</dblpsubmission>

The DBLP submission file is an XML file in the 1.0 specification [7]. The file should consist entirely of utf-8 characters [6]. The root element of the DBLP submission file is a ‹dblpsubmission› element.

The ‹dblpsubmission› element may contain any number of ‹proceedings› elements (in case of conference or workshop proceedings volumes) or ‹journal› elements (in case of journal volumes). However, to keep things simple, we strongly recommend to create one XML file per submitted volume. Also, please consider using some expressive filenames.

The structure of ‹proceedings› and ‹journal› document fragments differ to some degree. Please refer to Section "Conference and workshop proceedings" and Section "Journals" for a detailed description of each type.

Conference and workshop proceedings  

  <proceedings>
    <key>crypto</key>
    <editor>Tal Rabin</editor>
    <title>Advances in Cryptology - CRYPTO 2010.
      30th Annual Cryptology Conference.</title>
    <publisher>Springer</publisher>
    <year>2010</year>
    <isbn type="print">978-3-642-14622-0</isbn>
    <doi>10.1007/978-3-642-14623-7</doi>
    <conf>
      ...
    </conf>
    <series>
      ...
    </series>
    <toc>
      ...
    </toc>
  </proceedings>

Conference series key

To allow for the correct indexing of a submitted proceedings volume, it is helpful if the key of the conference series is given enclosed in ‹key› tags (see How to find the key of a person, a publication, or a stream). At most one such ‹key› element must be given in a ‹proceedings› element. If the key of a conference series is unknown, or the series is new to dblp, the ‹key› element may be omitted.

Editor(s)

Editor names can be provided in ‹editor› tags. In case of multiple editors, a new ‹editor› element has to be given for each individual editor, e.g.:

<editor>Maurizio Lenzerini</editor>
<editor>Thomas Schwentick</editor>

When doing so, please preserve ordering of the editors as given in printed edition. If no editor is known for the given proceedings volume, the ‹editor› element may be omitted.

Matching a given name with the correct dblp person record is an important issue. If the editor is already known to dblp, please provide the name as it is stored in dblp. If you want to provide information on the uft-8 representation of the editor name, you can give them by using the optional attribute original, e.g.:

<editor original="???">Chin-Chen Chang</editor>

For more information on names in dblp, please read Why do person names ignore certain unicode characters, How does dblp handle first names, middle names, family names, non-western names and How to find the key of a person, a publication, or a stream.

Proceedings volume title

The title of the proceedings volume should be given enclosed in ‹title› tags. Each valid proceedings submission has to include exactly one ‹title› element that may not be omitted. Please use the title of the proceedings volume as given on the cover page, including any possible subtitles.

Publisher

The publisher of the proceedings volume can be given enclosed in ‹publisher› tags. If the publisher is unknown, then the ‹publisher› element may be omitted.

Year of publication

The year the proceedings volume is published is given enclosed in ‹year› tags. Each valid proceedings submission has to include exactly one ‹year› element. Note that the year of publication might differ from the actual year the conference took place.

ISBN

Any available ISBN [2] of the proceedings volume can be given enclosed in ‹isbn› tags. Sometimes, a proceedings volume has multiple ISBN for different versions of the publication, such as print and electronic editions. If multiple ISBN are known, a new ‹isbn› element can be given for each individual number. If the publication type of an ISBN is known, it can be specified using the optional attribute type, e.g.:

<isbn type="print">978-3-642-14622-0</isbn>

DOI of proceedings volume

Sometimes, a DOI [1] is assigned to a whole proceedings volume. In such a case, this DOI may be given using ‹doi› tags. Note that the DOI of individual papers are given in the ‹toc› element below. If a certain HTTP proxy server is preferred when handling this DOI, it may be specified using the optional attribute proxy, e.g.:

<doi proxy="http://dx.doi.org/">10.1007/978-3-642-14623-7</doi>

Conference/workshop details

  <conf>
    <acronym>CRYPTO</acronym>
    <number>30</number>
    <location>Santa Barbara, California, USA</location>
    <date>August 15-19, 2010</date>
    <url>http://www.iacr.org/conferences/crypto2010/</url>
  </conf>

Additional details on the conference or workshop are given in a single ‹conf› element. Every valid proceedings submission has to include exactly one ‹conf› element. The ‹conf› element may have the following child elements, of which only the ‹location› and ‹date› elements are mandatory:

Series reference

  <series>
    <key>lncs</key>
    <title>Lecture Notes in Computer Science</title>
    <number>6223</number>
  </series>

Some conference or workshop proceedings are published as part of an ongoing series, such as Springer's Lecture Notes in Computer Science, the IFIP publication series, or the ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. In such a case, please provide information on the series using a ‹series› element.
This element may have the following child elements:

Table of contents

The table of contents is provided in a single ‹toc› element. The structure of this element is the same for conference proceedings and journal volumes. Each valid DBLP submission has to provide exactly one ‹toc› element per ‹proceedings› element. For more information on the table of contents, please refer to Section "Table of contents" .

Journals  

  <journal>
    <key>cacm</key>
    <title>Communications of the ACM</title>
    <short>Commun. ACM</short>
    <publisher>ACM</publisher>
    <address>New York</address>
    <issn type="print">0001-0782</issn>
    <issn type="electronic">1557-7317</issn>
    <url>http://cacm.acm.org/</url>
    <volume>
      ...
    </volume>
    <volume>
      ...
    </volume>
    ...
  </journal>

Journal key

To allow for the correct indexing of a submitted journal volumes, it is helpful if the key of the journal is given enclosed in ‹key› tags (see How to find the key of a person, a publication, or a stream). At most one such ‹key› element must be given in a ‹journal› element. If the key of a journal is unknown, or the journal is new to dblp, the ‹key› element may be omitted.

Journal title

The title of the journal should be given enclosed in ‹title› tags. Each valid journal submission has to include exactly one ‹title› element that may not be omitted. Please use the non-abbreviated title of the journal as given on the cover page.

Short title

If an abbreviated short title is commonly used for this journal, it may be given in ‹short› tags. If no short title is known, then the ‹short› element may be omitted.

Publisher

The publisher of the journal should be given enclosed in ‹publisher› tags. If the publisher is unknown, then the ‹publisher› element may be omitted.

Publisher's address

In addition, the publisher's address should be given enclosed in ‹address› tags. Please use the format "City, State/Province (if applicable), Country". If the publisher's address is unknown, then the ‹address› element may be omitted.

ISSN

Any available ISSN [3] of the journal can be given enclosed in ‹issn› tags. Sometimes, a journal has multiple ISSN for different versions of the publication, such as print and electronic editions. If multiple ISSN are known, a new ‹issn› element can be given for each individual number. If the publication type of an ISSN is known, it can be specified using the optional attribute type, e.g.:

<issn type="electronic">1557-7317</issn>

URL of the journal

If this journal has a website, its URL [5] may be given enclosed in ‹url› tags. If no URL is known, then this element may be omitted.

Journal volumes

  <volume>
    <number>50</number>
    <issue>
      ...
    </issue>
    <issue>
      ...
    </issue>
    ...
  </volume>

A ‹journal› element may contain any number of ‹volume› tags. Each ‹volume› represents a different journal volume. However, to keep the files simple, it might be a good idea to submit only a single journal volume per file. Each ‹volume› element must contain the following child elements:

Volume issues

  <issue>
    <number>1</number>
    <month>January</month>
    <year>2007</year>
    <toc>
      ...
    </toc>
  </issue>

Each ‹issue› element may have the following child elements:

Table of contents  

  <toc>
    <section>Session 1: Leakage</section>
    <publ>
      ...
    </publ>
    ...
    <section>Session 2: Lattices</section>
    <publ>
      ...
    </publ>
    ...
    <section>Invited Talk</section>
    <publ>
      ...
    </publ>
    ...
    <section>Rump Session</section>
    <text>The slides of the Rump Session are available at:
      http://rump2010.cr.yp.to/</text>
  </toc>

The ‹toc› element represents a traditional table of contents (toc) as found in printed proceeding volumes or journal issues. The toc will be printed in given order on DBLP's website. Hence, the ordering of the toc is of importance.

A ‹toc› element may have any number of the following kind of child elements: section headings, publication records, and multi-purpose text fields. The details of these child elements are addressed below. Please provide these elements in the same ordering as they are given in the printed edition of this volume.

Section headings

The toc may be structured using section headings. Section headings are used for many different reasons, e.g., to provide the topics of conference tracks or sessions, to distinguish paper presentations from poster sessions, or to provide the sections of a journal issue. The use of section headings is optional, but you are welcome to provide them since they greatly enhance the value of a toc.

In the case of conference proceedings, section headings may be provided in hierarchical levels. Headings on the uppermost level are given enclosed in ‹section› tags. If necessary, headings on lower levels may be given enclosed in ‹subsection›, ‹subsubsection›, or even ‹subsubsubsection› tags, e.g.:

<section>Top level</section>
<subsection>Second level</subsection>
<subsubsection>Third level</subsubsection>
<subsubsubsection>Bottom level</subsubsubsection>

In the case of journal issues, section headings usually describe the (non-hierarchical) sections of a journal. Hence, in this case DBLP will not distinguish between different levels of section headings. While it is syntactically possible to use ‹subsubsection› or even ‹subsubsubsection› tags in a journal issue toc, all section headings will be interpreted to be on the same level as a ‹section› element.

Text fields

Sometimes, additional information has to be given in a toc that is neither a section heading nor a publication record. This might be the case with notes on a special issue of a journal, comments on the previous or following publication in the toc, or a note in place of a withdrawn paper. To this end, place a ‹text› element at the appropriate location in the toc. Enclosed in these ‹text› tags, arbitrary text can be provided.

Publications

  <publ>
    <author>Chris Peikert</author>
    <title>An Efficient and Parallel Gaussian Sampler for Lattices.</title>
    <pages>80-97</pages>
    <doi>10.1007/978-3-642-14623-7_5</doi>
  </publ>

For each paper of the proceedings volume or journal issue, details on this paper has to be given enclosed in ‹publ› tags. A ‹publ› element has the following child elements:

References 

[1] International DOI Foundation, Inc., The DOI Handbook. Edition 4.4.1, doi:10.1000/186, 2006.
[2] International Organization for Standardization, Information and documentation -International standard book number (ISBN). ISO 2108:2005.
[3] International Organization for Standardization, Information and documentation - International standard serial number (ISSN). ISO 3297:2007.
[4] International Organization for Standardization, Information technology 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets. Part 1: Latin alphabet No. 1. ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998.
[5] T. Berners-Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill (editors), Uniform Resource Locators (URL). IETF, RFC 1738, December 1994.
[6] F. Yergeau, UTF-8, a transformation format of ISO 10646. IETF, RFC 2279, November 2003.
[7] W3C, Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0 W3C Recommendation. Fifth edition, 2008.

Attachments

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